November 19, 2015

Shirt Cuffs - A Complete Guide

If you are as unsure about the different types of shirt cuff, how to wear them and when to wear them, then we are here to walk you through the different options with our complete shirt cuff guide. Below we've listed the different styles and cuts so you'll be more knowledgable when choosing your shirt cuffs.

Barrel Cuff
The most common type of cuff seen on shirts. The corners of the cuff are square and the fastening can be secured with one or two buttons. These are the most casual shirt cuffs and they work well for shirts when paired with jeans and a blazer or sports coat. 

Barrel Cuff
Image Source: manuelracim.com

French Cuff 
French cuffs, also called double cuffs are double the length of a regular barrel cuff, which allows the material to be folded back over itself and secured with cufflinks or silk knots. When it comes to how to roll shirt cuffs, make sure the inner cuffs are ‘kissing’ so a flap is created rather than a barrel shape. These cuffs are perfect for dressed up formal black tie occasions where a tuxedo is to be worn.

 French Cuff

Image Source: frankandoak.com

Convertible Cuff
The convertible cuff is a combination of both the barrel cuff and the french cuff. The fastening can be secured with either a button or with a cufflink. The button sits on the exterior of the shirt next to the buttonholes, which allow for cufflinks to be inserted for a more formal look if desired. These cuffs are definitely our least favourite style of cuff are they are neither casual or formal.

Convertible Cuff 

Image Source: amazon.com

Single Cuff
The single cuff is similar to the barrel cuff, however instead of buttons it is fastened with cufflinks. This makes the cuffs much sleeker than french cuffs and is perfect for formal white tie occasions. In general this is not a common cuff type, most people tend to go with french cuffs when wearing cufflinks. In terms of its history, it was a popular style in Edwardian times and therefore if you wear them today with a suit jacket they can be seen as a slightly eccentric touch.

Single Cuff
Image Source: modernmancollection.com

Nowadays the Barrel cuff is the more popular cuff found on men’s shirts as its both practical and smart. It’s suitable for transitioning from office day wear to after work evening wear. However if you’re looking for something that will add more of a considered look to your outfit you could try these types of dress shirt cuffs.  

Mitered Cuff
Mitered cuffs are similar to barrel cuff, however, the corners of the cuff are sewn at a 45-degree angle. This detail is an interesting accent and gives your shirt a slightly more formal look. The cuffs can similarly be fastened with either one or two buttons.

Mitered cuff

Image Source: milkshirts.com

Turnback Cuff
The Turnback cuff which is also known as the cocktail cuff or the ‘James Bond’ cuff is similar to the french cuff, however instead of a cufflink fastening, they are fastened with a button instead. The turnback section of the cuff is also cut on an angle exposing the buttons. Like the single cuff, the turnback cuff can be seen as adding quite an 
eccentric touch to your look. 

 Turnback Cuff
Image Source: en.wikipedia.org

Monogrammed Shirt Cuffs
Embroidered monogrammed shirt cuffs were popular in the past as they were originally used to identify shirts when taken to the dry cleaners. However nowadays it's not particularly common to see monogrammed cuffs. However, like many gentleman's accessories when done in the right way it can add a subtle accent to your shirt cuffs.

Initials can be embroidered in several locations, so it is a case of personal preference. On the edge of the shirt cuff is the most common, however we also think on the sleeve placket is an elegant and unique placement that is much more understated. The embroidery should be subtle and blend in with the colour of the shirt so pick a tone one tone darker to lighter than the shirt.

Monogrammed Shirt Cuff
Image Source: rowenadowning.com

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